Privet, Oval Leaved

Privet, Oval Leaved

Privet, Oval Leaved

Privet seems to be unfashionable as a hedging plants these days - no doubt in part due to its widespread use as a cheap and cheerful replacement for iron railings which were removed as part of the war effort following a Government requisition order in 1941 - but it is a first rate choice as an economical semi-evergreen hedging plant, with much to recommend it.

Oval-leaved privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium)  is native to Japan and Korea, and was introduced into the UK in the late 1800’s. It has gradually taken over from the native Common privet (Ligustrum vulgare) as an urban and suburban hedging species. Smaller leaved than its native cousin, it forms a very dense screen when clipped regularly, and will remain evergreen all year round in a sheltered site, especially in the south of the UK. In a cold or exposed site, it will lose its leaves in winter, but will soon recover and refoliate in spring. Very tolerant of pollution, it is the number one choice for screening, windbreaks and noise reduction in urban areas.

The foliage is poisonous, so keep away from livestock. The small round berries are produced in abundance in late summer and are a valuable food source for many species of birds (although are mildly toxic to humans).

Privet grows at a fast rate - approx 50cm per year - so clip twice a year in spring and late summer to keep the hedge in check and looking at its best.

Plant in a single row, one plant every 45cm. Clip regularly from a young age to encourage a dense, bushy plant.

Plant sizes:

We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don’t think you can buy better.

 

<p dir="ltr"><span>Privet seems to be unfashionable as a hedging plants these days - no doubt in part due to its widespread use as a cheap and cheerful replacement for iron railings which were removed as part of the war effort following a Government requisition order in 1941 - but it is a first rate choice as an economical semi-evergreen hedging plant, with much to recommend it.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Oval-leaved privet (</span><span>Ligustrum ovalifolium) </span><span>&nbsp;is native to Japan and Korea, and was introduced into the UK in the late 1800&rsquo;s. It has gradually taken over from the native Common privet (</span><span>Ligustrum vulgare</span><span>) as an urban and suburban hedging species. Smaller leaved than its native cousin, it forms a very dense screen when clipped regularly, and will remain evergreen all year round in a sheltered site, especially in the south of the UK. In a cold or exposed site, it will lose its leaves in winter, but will soon recover and refoliate in spring. Very tolerant of pollution, it is the number one choice for screening, windbreaks and noise reduction in urban areas.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The foliage is poisonous, so keep away from livestock. The small round berries are produced in abundance in late summer and are a valuable food source for many species of birds (although are mildly toxic to humans).</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Privet grows at a fast rate - approx 50cm per year - so clip twice a year in spring and late summer to keep the hedge in check and looking at its best.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Plant in a single row, one plant every 45cm. Clip regularly from a young age to encourage a dense, bushy plant.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Plant sizes:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don&rsquo;t think you can buy better.</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p>