Rose, Dog

Rose, Dog

Rose, Dog

Roses are the UK’s best-loved flower, but they do not need to be kept in the flower border - there are many species which will do equally well either as a standalone flowering hedge, or else mixed in with a native mix. The roses we offer as hedging plants are all tough and robust, and will cope with a wide range of growing conditions.For a very pretty rose hedge, you can also consider any of the Hybrid Musk roses - Hybrid Musk - although they will require a little more attention than the specific hedging varieties.

Roses for hedging generally divide into two camps - those that make a substantial plant which can provide a dense hedge on their own (Rugosa roses, Scotch rose, Sweet Briar rose) and those climbers which can be used as part of a mixed hedge, to scramble their way through to provide extra interest and colour (Dog rose, Field rose).

Dog roses (Rosa canina) are a wonderful addition to mixed hedge - or even just a few planted in a row of hawthorn will considerably extend the period of interest and value for wildlife. The long stems wend their way through the hedge, and produce exquisite pale pink flowers in mid-summer. If left unpruned, these will then turn into bright orange hips, high in Vitamin C and used for syrups, teas, marmalades and wines. They are also a highly nutritious treat for birds and small mammals.

The Roman naturalist Pliny believed that the name came from the belief that the root of the dog rose could be used to treat the bite of a mad dog. 

Include in a mixed hedge, allow one plant every few metres to provide colour and interest.

Plant sizes:

We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don’t think you can buy better.

 

<p dir="ltr"><span>Roses are the UK&rsquo;s best-loved flower, but they do not need to be kept in the flower border - there are many species which will do equally well either as a standalone flowering hedge, or else mixed in with a native mix. The roses we offer as hedging plants are all tough and robust, and will cope with a wide range of growing conditions.For a very pretty rose hedge, you can also consider any of the Hybrid Musk roses -&nbsp;<a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/roses/hybrid-musk/">Hybrid Musk</a> - although they will require a little more attention than the specific hedging varieties.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Roses for hedging generally divide into two camps - those that make a substantial plant which can provide a dense hedge on their own (Rugosa roses, Scotch rose, Sweet Briar rose) and those climbers which can be used as part of a mixed hedge, to scramble their way through to provide extra interest and colour (Dog rose, Field rose).</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Dog roses (</span><span>Rosa canina</span><span>) are a wonderful addition to mixed hedge - or even just a few planted in a row of hawthorn will considerably extend the period of interest and value for wildlife. The long stems wend their way through the hedge, and produce exquisite pale pink flowers in mid-summer. If left unpruned, these will then turn into bright orange hips, high in Vitamin C and used for syrups, teas, marmalades and wines. They are also a highly nutritious treat for birds and small mammals.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>The Roman naturalist Pliny believed that the name came from the belief that the root of the dog rose could be used to treat the bite of a mad dog.&nbsp;</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>Include in a mixed hedge, allow one plant every few metres to provide colour and interest.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Plant sizes:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don&rsquo;t think you can buy better.</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p>