Rosa rubiginosa

Roses are the UK’s best-loved flower, but they do not need to be kept in the flower border - there are many species which will do equally well either as a standalone flowering hedge, or else mixed in with a native mix. The roses we offer as hedging plants are all tough and robust, and will cope with a wide range of growing conditions.For a very pretty rose hedge, you can also consider any of the Hybrid Musk roses - Hybrid Musk - although they will require a little more attention than the specific hedging varieties.

Roses for hedging generally divide into two camps - those that make a substantial plant which can provide a dense hedge on their own (Rugosa roses, Scotch rose, Sweet Briar rose) and those climbers which can be used as part of a mixed hedge, to scramble their way through to provide extra interest and colour (Dog rose, Field rose).

The Sweet Briar, or Eglantine rose (Rosa rubiginosa) is another excellent choice for an informal flowering hedge, or else mixed in with hawthorn and sloes to add summer interest. Growing to about 2m tall if left unpruned (although easy to keep smaller if required), this is another tough, hardy choice of inauspicious growing conditions. Often mistaken for the Dog rose, this produces similar pale pink single flowers in early summer, but the growth is slightly bushier so can be used as a single hedging variety on its own. The main difference is the apple-scented foliage, particularly fragrant after a summer shower or if the leaves are crushed. Bees and hoverflies love the flowers, whilst the highly nutritious orange hips are a prized treat for birds and small mammals - humans too, if you can salvage some for rose hip jam.

Plant sizes:

We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don’t think you can buy better.

<p dir="ltr">Roses are the UK&rsquo;s best-loved flower, but they do not need to be kept in the flower border - there are many species which will do equally well either as a standalone flowering hedge, or else mixed in with a native mix. The roses we offer as hedging plants are all tough and robust, and will cope with a wide range of growing conditions.For a very pretty rose hedge, you can also consider any of the Hybrid Musk roses -&nbsp;<a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/roses/hybrid-musk/">Hybrid Musk</a>&nbsp;- although they will require a little more attention than the specific hedging varieties.</p> <p dir="ltr">Roses for hedging generally divide into two camps - those that make a substantial plant which can provide a dense hedge on their own (Rugosa roses, Scotch rose, Sweet Briar rose) and those climbers which can be used as part of a mixed hedge, to scramble their way through to provide extra interest and colour (Dog rose, Field rose).</p> <p dir="ltr">The Sweet Briar, or Eglantine rose (Rosa rubiginosa)&nbsp;is another excellent choice for an informal flowering hedge, or else mixed in with hawthorn and sloes to add summer interest. Growing to about 2m tall if left unpruned (although easy to keep smaller if required), this is another tough, hardy choice of inauspicious growing conditions. Often mistaken for the Dog rose, this produces similar pale pink single flowers in early summer, but the growth is slightly bushier so can be used as a single hedging variety on its own. The main difference is the apple-scented foliage, particularly fragrant after a summer shower or if the leaves are crushed. Bees and hoverflies love the flowers, whilst the highly nutritious orange hips are a prized treat for birds and small mammals - humans too, if you can salvage some for rose hip jam.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Plant sizes:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">We pride ourselves on the quality of our hedging plants. As well as the height of the plants, we also specify the age of the plant - all are generally either two years old (1/1) or even three years old (1/2). This means they have a sturdy, extensive root system and strong stems, ready for the perfect start to your garden hedge. You may be able to buy cheaper, but we don&rsquo;t think you can buy better.</p>