Hybrid Perpetual

Hybrid Perpetual

Hybrid Perpetual

Hybrid Perpetuals are a very interesting type of rose that owe their origins to many of the types that preceded it, including Noisettes, Bourbons, Chinas and Portlands, and are the parent to today's Hybrid Tea roses. Whilst not strictly perpetual (i.e. continual flowering) they often produce a second crop of flowers in September. They tend to be somewhat coarse growing to about 1.5m, but with huge flowers on strong shoots and rather short flower stalks (inherited from the Portland roses), so that the flowers sit down among the leaves. Most are red, pink or white. No yellows were ever raised. The dominant class of roses in Victorian England, hybrid perpetuals emerged in 1838 as the first roses which successfully combined repeat blooming characteristics from Asian varieties with the old European lineages. Their name however is a misleading translation of 'remontants' meaning re-blooming rather than forever blooming! More than 1,000 Hybrid Perpetual varieties were bred in the latter part of the 19th Century - of which, probably less than 1/10th that number survive due to their rather limited colour palette and the ascendancy of Hybrid Teas and Floribundas. (Varieties include: 'Baron Girod de L'Ain', and 'Ferdinand Pichard').

For planting advice, see Planting Containerised Roses - RV Roger Ltd

For pruning advice, see A Guide to Pruning Roses - RV Roger Ltd

Or else email our highly skilled team with any questions and we will be only too happy to try and help sales@rvroger.co.uk

<p>Hybrid Perpetuals are a very interesting type of rose that owe their origins to many of the types that preceded it, including Noisettes, Bourbons, Chinas and Portlands, and are the parent to today's Hybrid Tea roses. Whilst not strictly perpetual (i.e. continual flowering) they often produce a second crop of flowers in September. They tend to be somewhat coarse growing to about 1.5m, but with huge flowers on strong shoots and rather short flower stalks (inherited from the Portland roses), so that the flowers sit down among the leaves. Most are red, pink or white. No yellows were ever raised. The dominant class of roses in Victorian England, hybrid perpetuals emerged in 1838 as the first roses which successfully combined repeat blooming characteristics from Asian varieties with the old European lineages. Their name however is a misleading translation of 'remontants' meaning re-blooming rather than forever blooming! More than 1,000 Hybrid Perpetual varieties were bred in the latter part of the 19th Century - of which, probably less than 1/10th that number survive due to their rather limited colour palette and the ascendancy of Hybrid Teas and Floribundas. (Varieties include: 'Baron Girod de L'Ain', and 'Ferdinand Pichard').</p> <p>For planting advice, see <a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/blog/planting-containerised-roses/">Planting Containerised Roses - RV Roger Ltd</a></p> <p>For pruning advice, see <a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/blog/a-guide-to-pruning-roses/">A Guide to Pruning Roses - RV Roger Ltd</a></p> <p>Or else email our highly skilled team with any questions and we will be only too happy to try and help <a href="mailto:sales@rvroger.co.uk">sales@rvroger.co.uk</a></p>