Noisette

Noisette

Noisette

The first Noisette rose was raised as a hybrid seedling by a South Carolina farmer named John Champneys. Its parents were a China rose (Probably 'Parson's Pink') and the autumn-flowering musk rose (Rosa moschata), resulting in a vigorous climbing rose producing huge clusters of small pink flowers from late spring to early autumn. John sent seedlings of his rose to his gardening friend and neighbour Philippe Noisette, who sent plants to his brother Louis in Paris, one of which produced a repeat-flowering climber ‘Blush Noisette’ (‘Noisette Carnée) in 1818, a variety which has remained popular to this day. Height is according to variety - 1.5m for the more shrubby forms, and up to 4m for the climbers. The early Noisette roses were fairly winter-hardy initially, however subsequent infusions of Tea rose genes created a 'Tea-Noisette' subclass with slightly reduced winter hardiness, but the advantage of smaller clusters of larger flowers including the well-known 'Gloire de Dijon' which is still available today. (Other notable varieties include: 'Mme. Alfred Carriere', and 'Marechal Niel').

For planting advice, see Planting Containerised Roses - RV Roger Ltd

For pruning advice, see A Guide to Pruning Roses - RV Roger Ltd

Or else email our highly skilled team with any questions and we will be only too happy to try and help sales@rvroger.co.uk

<p>The first Noisette rose was raised as a hybrid seedling by a South Carolina farmer named John Champneys. Its parents were a China rose (Probably 'Parson's Pink') and the autumn-flowering musk rose (Rosa moschata), resulting in a vigorous climbing rose producing huge clusters of small pink flowers from late spring to early autumn. John sent seedlings of his rose to his gardening friend and neighbour Philippe Noisette, who sent plants to his brother Louis in Paris, one of which produced a repeat-flowering climber &lsquo;Blush Noisette&rsquo; (&lsquo;Noisette Carn&eacute;e) in 1818, a variety which has remained popular to this day. Height is according to variety - 1.5m for the more shrubby forms, and up to 4m for the climbers. The early Noisette roses were fairly winter-hardy initially, however subsequent infusions of Tea rose genes created a 'Tea-Noisette' subclass with slightly reduced winter hardiness, but the advantage of smaller clusters of larger flowers including the well-known 'Gloire de Dijon' which is still available today. (Other notable varieties include: 'Mme. Alfred Carriere', and 'Marechal Niel').</p> <p>For planting advice, see <a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/blog/planting-containerised-roses/">Planting Containerised Roses - RV Roger Ltd</a></p> <p>For pruning advice, see <a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/blog/a-guide-to-pruning-roses/">A Guide to Pruning Roses - RV Roger Ltd</a></p> <p>Or else email our highly skilled team with any questions and we will be only too happy to try and help <a href="mailto:sales@rvroger.co.uk">sales@rvroger.co.uk</a></p>