Also known as the Asian pear, Chinese Pear, or Japanese Pear, it was previously believed to be too tender to do well in the North of the Britain. However, due to milder winters and the production of new hybrids, Nashi pears can now be successfully grown in most areas. The unusual fruit are generally shaped like a large russetted apple, and in contrast to European pears they remain quite hard even when fully ripe. The flavour is absolutely superb - very sweet, extremely juicy and accompanied by tones of butterscotch and brandy! The varieties we offer are all hardy and disease-resistant. Most Asian pears require a pollinator to set good crops - either plant another Nashi Pear or an early-flowering Europen Pear such as Williams Bon Cretien, which will work just as well. The fruit is not generally baked in pies or made into jams (unlike the European pear) as they they have a high water content and a crisp, grainy texture. The fruit tends to be quite large and fragrant, and when carefully wrapped it can last for several weeks or more in a cold, dry place.

Traditionally in East Asia the tree's flowers are a popular symbol of early spring, and it is a common sight in gardens and the countryside.

Nashi Pear

<p><span>Also known as the Asian pear, Chinese Pear, or Japanese Pear, it was previously believed to be too tender to do well in the North of the Britain. However, due to milder winters and the production of new hybrids, Nashi pears can now be successfully grown in most areas. The unusual fruit are generally shaped like a large russetted apple, and in contrast to European pears they remain quite hard even when fully ripe. The flavour is absolutely superb - very sweet, extremely juicy and accompanied by tones of butterscotch and brandy! The varieties we offer are all hardy and disease-resistant. Most Asian pears require a pollinator to set good crops - either plant another Nashi Pear or an early-flowering Europen Pear such as Williams Bon Cretien, which will work just as well. The fruit is not generally baked in pies or made into jams (unlike the European pear) as they they have a high water content and a crisp, grainy texture. The fruit tends to be quite large and fragrant, and when carefully wrapped it can last for several weeks or more in a cold, dry place.</span><br /><br /><span>Traditionally in East Asia the tree's flowers are a popular symbol of early spring, and it is a common sight in gardens and the countryside.</span></p>