Quince

Quince

Quince

Probably native to Central Asia, but long cultivated in Mediterranean Europe for its fruit, the quince is now naturalised in many areas. Not to be confused with the ornamental Japanese quince (or chaenomeles), the fruit of the quince tree is typically pear-shaped with a slightly 'felted' skin, and a mouth-wateringly intense aroma and flavour. However, most varieties are too hard and tart to be eaten raw, and even ripe fruits should be subjected to 'bletting' by frost or decay to be suitable for consumption. Alternatively, and more commonly, they may be cooked or roasted and used for jams, marmalade, jellies, or puddings, where they will impart a delicious fragrant taste to apple and pear dishes.

And, as if this is not enough - quince blossom in the springtime is amongst the best of all fruit trees in the garden having delicate white or pale pink saucer shaped blooms up to 5cms across.

Top fruit trees are all supplied as bare root plants during the winter months (November - March).

For help with choosing the correct rootstock for your needs, please click here A Guide to Rootstocks

<p><span>Probably native to Central Asia, but long cultivated in Mediterranean Europe for its fruit, the quince is now naturalised in many areas. Not to be confused with the ornamental Japanese quince (or chaenomeles), the fruit of the quince tree is typically pear-shaped with a slightly 'felted' skin, and a mouth-wateringly intense aroma and flavour. However, most varieties are too hard and tart to be eaten raw, and even ripe fruits should be subjected to 'bletting' by frost or decay to be suitable for consumption. Alternatively, and more commonly, they may be cooked or roasted and used for jams, marmalade, jellies, or puddings, where they will impart a delicious fragrant taste to apple and pear dishes.</span><br /><br /><span>And, as if this is not enough - quince blossom in the springtime is amongst the best of all fruit trees in the garden having delicate white or pale pink saucer shaped blooms up to 5cms across.</span></p> <p><span>Top fruit trees are all supplied as bare root plants during the winter months (November - March).</span></p> <p><span>For help with choosing the correct rootstock for your needs, please click here&nbsp;<a href="https://rvroger.co.uk/blog/a-guide-to-fruit-rootstocks/" target="_blank">A&nbsp;Guide to Rootstocks</a></span></p>