The Nectarine Tree (whose fruit take their name from the drink of the Olympic Gods called 'nectar') have been around for at least 2,000 years, yet are still considered a rather 'new' fruit. Charles Darwin noticed that peach trees spontaneously produced nectarines and that this also happens the other way around. Often described as smooth peaches, the flesh is sweet, succulent and firm, and contain a good amount of vitamins A and C. The tree is almost identical to the peach in appearance, culture and care. Varieties are mostly self-fertile and the fruit is fragrant, brightly coloured, sweet and wonderful to eat fresh or used in cooking.

If you are growing nectarine outside, then planting against a south facing wall is ideal as they need a warm sheltered site in order to do their best. Also, it makes it easier to protect the tree with a plastic sheet over winter to help to stave off the risk of contracting 'Peach Leaf Curl' disease. If you have a greenhouse, or conservatory, then they will grow happily there, and if you have them in a pot or container, you can moved them outside into the sunshine for the summer time.

Nectarine

<p><span>The Nectarine Tree (whose fruit take their name from the drink of the Olympic Gods called 'nectar') have been around for at least 2,000 years, yet are still considered a rather 'new' fruit. Charles Darwin noticed that peach trees spontaneously produced nectarines and that this also happens the other way around. Often described as smooth peaches, the flesh is sweet, succulent and firm, and contain a good amount of vitamins A and C. The tree is almost identical to the peach in appearance, culture and care. Varieties are mostly self-fertile and the fruit is fragrant, brightly coloured, sweet and wonderful to eat fresh or used in cooking.</span><br /><br /><span>If you are growing nectarine outside, then planting against a south facing wall is ideal as they need a warm sheltered site in order to do their best. Also, it makes it easier to protect the tree with a plastic sheet over winter to help to stave off the risk of contracting 'Peach Leaf Curl' disease. If you have a greenhouse, or conservatory, then they will grow happily there, and if you have them in a pot or container, you can moved them outside into the sunshine for the summer time.</span></p>